MEXICO

Culture

The culture of Mexico reflects the country’s complex history and is the result of the gradual blending of native culture (particularly Mesoamerican) with Spanish culture and other immigrant cultures.

First inhabited more than 10,000 years ago, the cultures that developed in Mexico became one of the cradles of civilization. During the 300 year rule by the Spanish, Mexico became a crossroad for the people and cultures of Europe, Africa and Asia. The government of independent Mexico actively promoted shared cultural traits in order to create a national identity.

The culture of an individual Mexican is influenced by their familial ties, gender, religion, location and social class, among other factors. In many ways, contemporary life in the cities of Mexico has become similar to that in neighboring United States and Europe, with provincial people conserving traditions more so than the city dwellers.

Nature

High, rugged mountains; low coastal plains; high plateaus; temperate plains with grasslands and Mezquite trees in the northeast, desert and even more rugged mountains in the northwest, tropical rainforests in the south and southeast {Chiapas, Campeche, Yucatán y Quintana Roo} semiarid in places like {Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosí} and temperate coniferous and deciduous forests in the central part of the country {Mexico City, Toluca}.

Climate

Mexico uses the metric system for all measurements. All weather forecasts are in Celsius (°C).
The climate varies dramatically across Mexico’s vast landscape. In the northernmost area of the Baja Peninsula, on the Pacific coast, the climate is Mediterranean. Whereas the climate is arid on the other side of the peninsula, facing the Sea of Cortez. As you go south on the Baja Peninsula, the climate changes to become a subtropical sub-arid/semi-arid climate, until you reach La Paz and Cabo, which has a unique tropical desert climate. On the mainland, the northern area of Mexico tends to be mountainous and chilly. Moreover, the lower areas have an arid climate. A tropical climate prevails from around the Tampico area down to Cancun, as well as the adjacent side on the Pacific.

Operated by:

Solana Tours

Culture

The culture of Mexico reflects the country’s complex history and is the result of the gradual blending of native culture (particularly Mesoamerican) with Spanish culture and other immigrant cultures.
First inhabited more than 10,000 years ago, the cultures that developed in Mexico became one of the cradles of civilization. During the 300 year rule by the Spanish, Mexico became a crossroad for the people and cultures of Europe, Africa and Asia. The government of independent Mexico actively promoted shared cultural traits in order to create a national identity.
The culture of an individual Mexican is influenced by their familial ties, gender, religion, location and social class, among other factors. In many ways, contemporary life in the cities of Mexico has become similar to that in neighboring United States and Europe, with provincial people conserving traditions more so than the city dwellers.

Religion

Our Lady of Guadalupe, the patron saint of Mexico.
The Spanish arrival and colonization brought Roman Catholicism to the country, which became the main religion of Mexico. Mexico is a secular state, and the Constitution of 1917 and anti-clerical laws imposed limitations on the church and sometimes codified state intrusion into church matters. The government does not provide any financial contributions to the church, and the church does not participate in public education.
95.6% of the population were Christian in 2010. Roman Catholics are 89% of the total, 47% percent of whom attend church services weekly. In absolute terms, Mexico has the world’s second largest number of Catholics after Brazil. According to the Government’s 2000 census, approximately 87 percent of respondents identified themselves as at least nominally Roman Catholic.
Other religious groups for which the 2000 census provided estimates included evangelicals, with 1.71 percent of the population; other Protestant evangelical groups, 2.79 percent; members of Jehovah’s Witnesses, 1.25 percent; “Historical” Protestants, 0.71 percent; Seventh-day Adventists, 0.58 percent; The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 0.25 percent; Jews, 0.05 percent; and other religions, 0.31 percent. Approximately 3.52 percent of respondents indicated no religion, and 0.86 percent did not specify a religion
The culture of Mexico reflects the country’s complex history and is the result of the gradual blending of native culture (particularly Mesoamerican) with Spanish culture and other immigrant cultures.

First inhabited more than 10,000 years ago, the cultures that developed in Mexico became one of the cradles of civilization. During the 300 year rule by the Spanish, Mexico became a crossroad for the people and cultures of Europe, Africa and Asia. The government of independent Mexico actively promoted shared cultural traits in order to create a national identity.
The culture of an individual Mexican is influenced by their familial ties, gender, religion, location and social class, among other factors. In many ways, contemporary life in the cities of Mexico has become similar to that in neighboring United States and Europe, with provincial people conserving traditions more so than the city dwellers.

Nature

High, rugged mountains; low coastal plains; high plateaus; temperate plains with grasslands and Mezquite trees in the northeast, desert and even more rugged mountains in the northwest, tropical rainforests in the south and southeast {Chiapas, Campeche, Yucatán y Quintana Roo} semiarid in places like {Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosí} and temperate coniferous and deciduous forests in the central part of the country {Mexico City, Toluca}.

Climate

Mexico uses the metric system for all measurements. All weather forecasts are in Celsius (°C).
The climate varies dramatically across Mexico’s vast landscape. In the northernmost area of the Baja Peninsula, on the Pacific coast, the climate is Mediterranean. Whereas the climate is arid on the other side of the peninsula, facing the Sea of Cortez. As you go south on the Baja Peninsula, the climate changes to become a subtropical sub-arid/semi-arid climate, until you reach La Paz and Cabo, which has a unique tropical desert climate. On the mainland, the northern area of Mexico tends to be mountainous and chilly. Moreover, the lower areas have an arid climate. A tropical climate prevails from around the Tampico area down to Cancun, as well as the adjacent side on the Pacific.

Time & Date:
1. General GMT -6
2. Baja California GMT -7
3. Baja California Sur, Chihuahua, Nayarit & Sinaloa GMT -8

Currency:
The Mexican peso (sign: $; code: MXN) is the currency of Mexico. Modern peso and dollar currencies have a common origin in the 15th–19th century Spanish dollar, most continuing to use its sign, “$”.[1] The Mexican peso is the 8th most traded currency in the world, the third most traded currency originating from the Americas (after the United States dollar and Canadian dollar), and the most traded currency originating from Latin America.[2] The current ISO 4217 code for the peso is MXN; prior to the 1993 revaluation (see below), the code MXP was used. The peso is subdivided into 100 centavos, represented by “¢”. As of October 7, 2017, the peso’s exchange rate was $21.76 per Euro and $18.56 per U.S. dollar.

Languages:
Several different languages are spoken in Mexico, with a large majority of the population fluent in Spanish while some Indigenous Mexicans are monolingual in indigenous languages. Today, Mexicans predominantly speak Spanish and learn English as a second language.
The government of Mexico uses Spanish for most official purposes, but in terms of legislation its status is not that of an official The Law of Linguistic Rights establishes Spanish as one of the country’s national languages, along with 68 distinct indigenous languages (from seven different families, and other four isolated languages). The law, promulgated in 2003, requires the state to offer all of its services to its indigenous citizens in their mother tongues, but in practice this is not yet the case. Note that the actual number of spoken languages in Mexico is much higher than the 68 groups mentioned here; National Institute of Indigenous Languages (INALI) identifies only macro-languages and distinct ethnic groups for the purposes of political classification. For instance, Mixtec is identified as a single language within this list of 68 languages. However, there are at least 12 distinct Mixtec dialect regions, each which includes a language that is not mutually intelligible with the other dialect regions (Josserand, 1983). The Ethnologue currently states that 287 distinct languages are currently spoken in Mexico (Lewis et al. 2013).

Due to the long history of marginalization of indigenous groups, most indigenous languages are endangered, with some languages expected to become extinct within years or decades, and others simply having populations that grow slower than the national average. According to the Commission for the Development of Indigenous Peoples (CDI) and National Institute of Indigenous Languages (INALI), while 10–14% of the population identifies as belonging to an indigenous group, around 6% speak an indigenous language.

Travel Insurance:
When buying your travel insurance, always check the small print – some policies specifically exclude ‘dangerous activities’, which could be anything from scuba diving to horse riding. You should check whether the medical coverage is on a pay first, claim later basis and, more importantly, ensure that your medical coverage includes the cost of medical evacuation.

Visa:
Whether you need to apply for a visa before traveling to Mexico depends on:
• which country issued your passport, or
• whether you have legal residency or a visa for certain countries, or
• whether you have APEC business travel privileges

International Airports:
Mexico City International Airport
Guadalajara International Airport
Cancún International Airport
General Mariano Escobedo International Airport
Federal de Bachigualato International Airport
Hermosillo International Airport
Tijuana International Airport
Lic. Gustavo Díaz Ordaz International Airport
General Roberto Fierro Villalobos International Airport
Los Cabos International Airport
General Heriberto Jara International Airport
Manuel Crescencio Rejón International Airport
Del Bajío International Airport
Acapulco International Airport
Mazatlán International Airport
Ponciano Arriaga International Airport
General Francisco Javier Mina International Airport
Carlos Rovirosa Pérez International Airport
General Guadalupe Victoria International Airport
Manuel Márquez de León International Airport

Capital: Mexico City
Currency: Mexican Peso
Population: 127.5 million
Official languages: Spanish

Operated by:

Solana Tours
2017-12-01T12:54:22+00:00